Tuesday, March 13, 2012

Top 10 Most Educated Countries in the World

In the past 50 years, college graduation rates in developed countries have increased nearly 200%, according to Education at a Glance 2011, a recently published report by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development ( OECD ). The report shows that while education has improved across the board, it has not improved evenly, with some countries enjoying much greater rates of educational attainment than others. The countries with the most highly educated citizens are also some of the wealthiest in the world.  All these countries aggressively invest in education. Based on the report, 24/7 Wall St. identified the 10 developed countries with the most educated populations. Now take a look at these countries one by one...


10. Finland


> Pct. population with post secondary education: 37%
> Avg. annual growth rate (1999 2009): 1.8% (3rd lowest)
> GDP per capita: $36,585 (14th highest)
> Pop. change (2000 2009): 3.15% (10th lowest)

Finland is a small country relative to the other OECD members. The share of its adult population with some sort of post secondary education, however, is rather large. This select group is reaching the end of its expansion. From 1999 to 2009, the number of college-educated adults increased only 1.8% annually the third-smallest amount among all OECD countries . Finland is also one of only two countries, the other being Korea, in which the fields of social sciences, business and law are not the most popular among students. In Finland, new entrants are most likely to study engineering, manufacturing and construction.

9. Australia


> Pct. population with post secondary education: 37%
> Avg. annual growth rate (1999 2009): 3.3% (11th lowest)
> GDP per capita: $40,719 (6th highest)
> Pop. change (2000 2009): 14.63% (3rd highest)

Australia's population grew 14.63% between 2000 and 2009. This is the third-largest increase among OECD countries . Its tertiary-educated adult population is increasing at the much less impressive annual rate of 3.3%. Australia also spends the sixth-least amount in public funds on education as a percentage of all expenditures. The country also draws large numbers of international students.

8. United Kingdom


> Pct. population with post secondary education: 37%
> Avg. annual growth rate (1999 2009): 4.0% (9th highest)
> GDP per capita: $35,504 (16th highest)
> Pop. change (2000 2009): 3.47% (13th lowest)

Unlike most of the countries with the highest percentage of educated adults, the UK's educated group increased measurably more than 4% between 1999 and 2009. Its entire population only grew 3.5% between 2000 and 2009. One aspect that the UK does share with a number of other countries on this list is relatively low public expenditure on education institutions as a percentage of all educational spending. As of 2008, 69.5% of spending came from public sources the fourth-smallest amount among OECD countries .

7. Norway


> Pct. population with post secondary education: 37%
> Avg. annual growth rate (1999 2009): N/A
> GDP per capita: $56,617 (2nd highest)
> Pop. change (2000 2009): 7.52% (14th highest)

Norway has the third-greatest expenditure on educational institutions as a percentage of GDP, at 7.3%. Roughly 23% of that is spent on tertiary education . In Norway, more than 60% of all tertiary graduates were in a bachelors program, well more than the U.S., which is close to the OECD average of 45%. The country is one of the wealthiest in the world. GDP per capita is $56,617, second only to Luxembourg in the OECD.

6. South Korea


> Pct. population with post secondary education: 39%
> Avg. annual growth rate (1999 2009): 5.3% (5th highest)
> GDP per capita: $29,101 (13th lowest)
> Pop. change (2000 2009): 3.70% (14th lowest)

Korea is another standout country for its recent increase in the percentage of its population that has a tertiary education. Graduates increased 5.3% between 1999 and 2009, the fifth-highest among OECD countries . Like the UK, this rate is greater than the countrys recent population growth. Korea is also one of only two countries the other being Finland in which the most popular fields of study are not social sciences, business and law. In Korea, new students choose to study education, humanities and arts at the greatest rates. Only 59.6% of expenditures on educational institutions come from public funds the second-lowest rate.

5. New Zealand


> Pct. population with post secondary education: 40%
> Avg. annual growth rate (1999 2009): 3.5% (14th lowest)
> GDP per capita: $29,871 (14th lowest)
> Pop. change (2000 2009): 11.88% (8th largest)

New Zealand is not a particularly wealthy country. GDP per capita is less than $30,000, and is the 14th lowest in the OECD. However, 40% of the population engages in tertiary education, the fifth-highest rate in the world. The country actually has a rapidly growing population, increasing 11.88% between 2000 and 2009. This was the eighth-largest increase in the OECD. Part of the reason for the high rate of tertiary graduates is the high output from secondary schools. More than 90% of residents graduate from secondary school.

4. United States


> Pct. population with post secondary education: 41%
> Avg. annual growth rate (1999 2009): 1.4% (the lowest)
> GDP per capita: $46,588 (4th highest)
> Pop. change (2000 2009): 8.68% (12th highest)

The U.S. experienced a fairly large growth in population from 2000 to 2009. During the period, the population increased 8.68% the 12th highest among OECD countries. Meanwhile, the rate at which the share of the population with a tertiary education is growing has slowed to an annual rate of 1.4% the lowest among the 34 OECD countries. Just 71% of funding for educational institutions in the country comes from public funds, placing the U.S. sixth-lowest in this measure. Among OECD countries, the largest share of adults with a tertiary education live in the United States 25.8%.

3. Japan


> Pct. population with post secondary education: 44%
> Avg. annual growth rate (1999 2009): 3.2% (10th lowest)
> GDP per capita: $33,751 (17th lowest)
> Pop. change (2000 2009): 0.46% (6th lowest)

In Japan, 44% of the adult population has some form of tertiary education. The U.S. by comparison has a rate of 41%. Japans population increased just 0.46% between 2000 and 2009, the sixth-slowest growth rate in the OECD, and the slowest among our list of 10. Japan is tied with Finland for the third-highest upper-secondary graduation rate in the world, at 95%. It has the third-highest tertiary graduation rate in the world, but only spends the equivalent of 1.5% of GDP on tertiary education the 17th lowest rate in the OECD.

2. Israel


> Pct. population with post secondary education: 45%
> Avg. annual growth rate (1999 2009): N/A
> GDP per capita: $28,596 (12th lowest)
> Pop. change (2000 2009): 19.02% (the highest)

Although there is no data on the percentage of Israeli citizens with post secondary education dating back to 1999, the numbers going back to 2002 show that growth is slowing dramatically compared to other countries. In fact, in 2006, 46% of adults ages 25 to 64 had a tertiary education. In 2007 this number fell to 44%. Only 78% of funds spent on educational institutions in Israel are public funds. The country is also only one of three the other two being Ireland and Sweden where expenditure on educational institutions as a proportion of GDP decreased from 2000 to 2008. Israel also had the largest increase in overall population, approximately 19% from 2000 to 2009.

1. Canada


> Pct. population with post secondary education: 50%
> Avg. annual growth rate (1999 2009): 2.3% (5th lowest)
> GDP per capita: $39,070 (10th highest)
> Pop. change (2000 2009): 9.89% (10th highest)

In Canada, 50% of the adult population has completed tertiary education, easily the highest rate in the OECD. Each year, public and private expenditure on education amount to 2.5% of GDP, the fourth-highest rate in the world. Tertiary education spending accounts for 41% of total education spending in the country. In the U.S., the proportion is closer to 37%. In Israel, the rate is 22%. In Canada, nearly 25% of students have an immigrant background.

2011 Annual 'Fat and Beautiful' Beauty Contest Held in Beersheba

To be fat is not a sin and being fat does not make you body look ugly. This is what this contest is all about... Miss Fat and Beautiful is a beauty contest for plus sized women held annually in a cultural center in the southern desert city of Beersheva, Israel. To qualify for this contest, participants must weigh at least 176 pounds (80 kg) and this year's contest included several women who weighed in at over 250 pounds (120 Kg).


The winner of this year's annual 'Fat and Beautiful' beauty pageant is 23-year old, Russian born, Tanya Fayman.


Miss Fat & Beautiful is the brainchild of modeling agent, Esterica Nagid, who claims she encountered much resistance when she first suggested the idea in the mid 1990’s. "I launched this competition for the first time 15 years ago, and when I raised the idea people called me crazy,” Nagid explains. "But when I organized it and promoted it, even I was surprised by how many women wanted to take part.”



Contests like Miss Fat & Beautiful encourage women to love themselves in their bodies, embolden and boost confidence, and force us worldwide to question the norms that society has set for us.










Corinth Channel - A Unique Place in Greece

The Corinth Canal is a canal that connects the Gulf of Corinth with the Saronic Gulf in the Aegean Sea. It cuts through the narrow Isthmus of Corinth and separates the Peloponnesian peninsula from the Greek mainland, thus effectively making the former an island.


The idea to build a channel existed since the ancient times. Alexander the Great, Julius Caesar and Caligula all had plans to dig the channel and Nero even started the construction works in 67 A.C. but they interrupted by the emperor’s death in 69 A.C. So the channel was constructed only in the late XIX century by French engineers when the government of Greece commissioned the works.


Apart from creating a transport shortcut, the Corinth Channel also became a local landmark attracting tourists from all over the world. The channel is 6343 m (20,810 ft.) long, its width ranges from 25 to 21 m (82 to 69 ft.) and the height from its topmost points to the surface of the water is 90 m (295 ft.). The water in the channel is 8 m (26 ft.) deep.


Although the canal saves the 700-kilometre journey around the Peloponnese, it is too narrow for modern ocean freighters as it can only accommodate ships of a width of up to 16.5 meters (54 ft) and a depth of 7.3 meters (24 ft). Ships can only pass through the canal one at a time on a one-way system. Larger ships have to be towed by tugs.The canal is nowadays mostly used by tourist ships. About 11,000 ships per year travel through this unique waterway.